Volunteering

Join us Sunday, May 22, 2016 from 10 AM until 4 PM for a work party for the benefit of Monarch butterflies. We will be planting swamp milkweed and meadow blazing star plants, species especially attractive to Monarchs.

Meet at the barn at 4609 Pleasant Valley Road, Black Earth, WI 53515.

 

We could not do restoration work without volunteers. Send an email for information (use the Contact form on the menu sidebar).


 

Controlled Burns

Prescribed fire is a critical aspect of savanna and prairie restoration. Most fires at Pleasant Valley Conservancy require crews of at least 6 people, and more are preferable. The lead fire personnel are contractors, but volunteers participate. Volunteers who participate in Pleasant Valley Conservancy burns have had prescribed fire courses and considerable burn experience. However, people new to burns are also welcome to be involved, either as participants or as observers.


Seed Collecting

Virtually all of the seed used in restoration at Pleasant Valley Conservancy has been collected by hand, often by volunteers. Seed collecting is a major fall activity, beginning in early September and extending to early November. In most years, seeds from over 100 species are collected, often more.

We always have a Seed Collecting Event on the second Sunday in October. We collect in the morning at Pleasant Valley Conservancy and in the afternoon at Black Earth Rettenmund Prairie. Lunch is included! You can come for morning (9:30 AM to noon) at Pleasant Valley, afternoon (1 PM to 4 PM at Black Earth, or all day. In either case, please stay for lunch at noon at the cabin (Pleasant Valley). For details, call Kathie Brock at 608-238-5050.

The photos below show a group of volunteers collecting Indian grass in Toby's Prairie. On a fine fall day, there is no more relaxing activity than collecting seed! Children are welcome (all ages).

Photo below: Lunch being served to the seed collecting group.

 

Planting Prairies and Savannas

Volunteers play an important role in planting prairies. All of the seed are planted by hand, and many hands make short work of the task.

Above. Volunteer group who have just finished planting the Pocket Prairie, November 1999.
Below. The Pocket Prairie five years later.